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Interactive Rock Climbing Playground Equipment: Modeling through Service

  • Mikiko Oono
  • Koji Kitamura
  • Yoshifumi Nishida
  • Yoichi Motomura
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8013)

Abstract

Rock-climbing is a tool for investigating a full-body interaction. To design physical and psychological interaction with rock-climbing equipment, it is critical that scientific data on children’s interaction with the equipment be collected. We developed a rock-climbing wall with embedded sensors to record the physical behavior of children while playing on the wall. Over 1000 children participated in this study. With the aim of creating an evidenced-based interaction design of climbing, we formulated a climbing behavior model to see the relationship among influencing variables that describe climbing activities.

Keywords

embedded sensor network full-body interaction children’s behavior model playground equipment 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mikiko Oono
    • 1
  • Koji Kitamura
    • 1
  • Yoshifumi Nishida
    • 1
  • Yoichi Motomura
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)Japan

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