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From Research to Design - Sketching a Game to Trigger Reminiscence in Older Adults

  • Naemi Luckner
  • Fares Kayali
  • Oliver Hödl
  • Peter Purgathofer
  • Geraldine Fitzpatrick
  • Erika Mosor
  • Daniela Schlager-Jaschky
  • Tanja Stamm
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7946)

Abstract

This contribution describes a series of design sketches for a playful digital application designed to trigger reminiscence in older adults. The goal of the intervention is to be a preventive measure against cognitive disabilities such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Research shows that reminiscence and cognitive activities are beneficial in this area. The presented sketches have been developed as part of a design workshop and are based upon the results of a focus group study which involved older adults, their families, experts and care personnel. The ideas are all rooted within the context of the project which revolves around the playful use of media such as photos, video clips and audio recordings. These personal media artifacts shall trigger reminiscence and engage players cognitively.

Keywords

reminiscence dementia older adults play serious games 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naemi Luckner
    • 1
  • Fares Kayali
    • 1
  • Oliver Hödl
    • 1
  • Peter Purgathofer
    • 1
  • Geraldine Fitzpatrick
    • 1
  • Erika Mosor
    • 2
  • Daniela Schlager-Jaschky
    • 2
  • Tanja Stamm
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Design and Assessment of TechnologyVienna University of TechnologyAustria
  2. 2.Department of HealthFH Campus WienViennaAustria
  3. 3.Department of RheumatologyMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria

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