Effect of Deep-Breath Biofeedback on Heart Rate Variability and Blood Pressure at High Altitude

  • Qingfeng Liu
  • Huamiao Song
  • Yi Du
  • Zhengtao Cao
  • Yubin Zhou
  • Fei Peng
  • Liu Yang
  • Lei Yang
  • Yongchang Luo
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 259)

Abstract

The objective of this study is to study the effect of deep respiration on heart rate variability and blood pressure at high altitude. Methods: Experiments were conducted in 74 male military operators who have been deployed to 3,780-m-high altitude for 60 days. Heart rate variability and blood pressure were monitored at rest state and deep-breath biofeedback state. Result: Heart rate of deep-breath biofeedback was significantly lower than that of the rest (t = 2.01, P = 0.043). SDNN and LF were significantly higher (t = 3.70, 5.40, P < 0.001). There was no difference in HF (P > 0.05).Both systolic pressure and diastolic pressure of biofeedback state were significantly lower (t = 4.06, 7.63, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Deep-breath biofeedback can increase heart rate variability and reduce heart rate and blood pressure in high altitude. It is an important assistant method used to acclimatize high altitude which can bring positive psychophysiological change to military operators.

Keywords

Hypoxia Deep-breath Biofeedback Heart rate variability Blood pressure Military 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qingfeng Liu
    • 1
  • Huamiao Song
    • 1
  • Yi Du
    • 2
  • Zhengtao Cao
    • 1
  • Yubin Zhou
    • 1
  • Fei Peng
    • 1
  • Liu Yang
    • 1
  • Lei Yang
    • 1
  • Yongchang Luo
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Aviation Medicine AFBeijingChina
  2. 2.Troops 95455 PLAChongqingChina

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