Taming the Complexity of Natural and Artificial Evolutionary Dynamics

Abstract

The study of complex adaptive systems is among the key modern tasks in science. Such systems show radically different behaviours at different scales and in different environments, and mathematical modelling of such emergent behaviour is very difficult, even at the conceptual level. We require a new methodology to study and understand complex, emergent macroscopic phenomena. Coarse graining, a technique that originated in statistical physics, involves taking a system with many microscopic degrees of freedom and finding an appropriate subset of collective variables that offer a compact, computationally feasible description of the system, in terms of which the dynamics looks “natural”. This paper presents the key ideas of the approach and shows how it can be applied to evolutionary dynamics.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Computer Science and Electronic EngineeringUniversity of EssexColchesterUK
  2. 2.Instituto de Ciencias NuclearesUNAMMexico CityMexico

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