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A Historical Case Study of a “Nested Analogy”

  • Nora Alejandrina Schwartz
Conference paper
Part of the Studies in Applied Philosophy, Epistemology and Rational Ethics book series (SAPERE, volume 8)

Abstract

In order to understand human neuromuscular function, Luigi Galvani had to face the problem relative to the way in which “animal electricity” may be stored in animal tissue. Searching for a solution, Galvani built a hybrid model which constitutes a “nested analogy”. This model satisfies constraints provided by objects of his work environment. I defend the claim that the model visual structure is based on a factual or physical scenario—as opposed to counterfactual or imaginary. But this assertion does not imply that the visual structure comes from an existing structure recognized as the target.

Keywords

Luigi Galvani Nested analogy Visual structure 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Economics FacultyUniversity of Buenos AiresBuenos AiresArgentina

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