Granulated Blast Furnace Slag

Chapter
Part of the Springer Geochemistry/Mineralogy book series (SPRINGERGEOCHEM)

Abstract

Metallurgical industry produces slag as by-products. Iron blast furnace slag is the major non-metallic product consisting of silicates and aluminosilicates of calcium. They are formed either in glassy texture used as a cementitious materials or in crystalline forms used as aggregates. Other slags such as copper slag have pozzolanic properties and react with lime. Steel slags are usually produced in crystalline form and are used as base materials for road construction or as aggregates in special concrete productions. The other utilizations of slags are in the production of slag wool for thermal isolation in the building industry and as lightweight aggregates for lightweight concretes. This part deals with the production and properties of iron blast furnace slag to be used as a binder in the cement and concrete industries.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Concrete Technology Center, Civil EngineeringAmirkabir UniversityTehranIran

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