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Brief History of DNA Nanotechnology

Abstract

DNA is the acronym of deoxyribonucleic acid and probably one of the most well-known scientific terms. DNA is in fact a biopolymer consisting of repeating units, i.e., four types of nucleotides, adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C). Each nucleotide is composed of nucleobases (informally, bases) and sugars. These nucleobases are linked via ester bonds between the sugar and the phosphate groups, forming the backbone of DNA polymers. Two DNA polymers with complementary base sequences can be paired following the strict Watson-Crick rule, A-T and G-C, resulting in the formation of the well-known DNA double helix.

Keywords

  • Nanoscale Building Block
  • Fret Pair
  • Staple Strand
  • Supramolecular Nanostructures
  • Direct Protein Synthesis

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Chunhai Fan or Di Li .

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Fan, C., Li, D. (2013). Brief History of DNA Nanotechnology. In: Fan, C. (eds) DNA Nanotechnology. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-36077-0_1

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