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Modeling the Basic Cause-Effect Relationship Between Supply Chain Events and Performance

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Dynamics in Logistics

Part of the book series: Lecture Notes in Logistics ((LNLO))

Abstract

The increased integration of global supply networks with a reduction in stock and time buffers has raised their vulnerability to disturbances (i.e., events) that erode efficiency and competitiveness. The complex interrelationships in these networks lead to a cascade of knock-on effects that affect company performance in varying degrees. Hence, causality analysis is the key for early identification of critical events. To this end, a dynamic model is developed in this contribution. It describes the basic cause-effect relationship between events, their knock-on effects and company-internal performance indicators. To make the complexity of this task manageable, an effects-based classification of events is delineated from the EPCIS format. The utility and functionality of the model is illustrated on two examples. It is proposed that it serves as a basic outline for the logic foundation of the discovery component of supply chain event management (SCEM) systems.

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Correspondence to Georg Heinecke .

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Heinecke, G., Köber, J., Kunz, A., Lamparter, S. (2013). Modeling the Basic Cause-Effect Relationship Between Supply Chain Events and Performance. In: Kreowski, HJ., Scholz-Reiter, B., Thoben, KD. (eds) Dynamics in Logistics. Lecture Notes in Logistics. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-35966-8_13

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-35966-8_13

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-642-35965-1

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-642-35966-8

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