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Quantum-Like Behavior of Classical Systems

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNTCS,volume 7620)

Abstract

Bohmian mechanics is an example for a classical theory with a (Newtonian) ontology which reproduces all features of quantum mechanics. It is often used as a “classical” formulation of quantum mechanics, but in this article we invert the argument: Bohmian mechanics proves that there are classical systems which can show a quantum-like behavior; in particular, such models are able to explain non-classical probabilities. We analyze the general structure of Bohmian-type models and argue, that neural processes related to the correlates of mental states are likely to follow a dynamics which is similar to this class of models. Therefore, it may not be too surprising that cognitive phenomena under certain circumstances show a quantum-like behavior.

Keywords

  • Non-classical probability
  • Bohmian mechanics
  • Neural correlates of mental processes

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Filk, T. (2012). Quantum-Like Behavior of Classical Systems. In: Busemeyer, J.R., Dubois, F., Lambert-Mogiliansky, A., Melucci, M. (eds) Quantum Interaction. QI 2012. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 7620. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-35659-9_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-35659-9_18

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-642-35658-2

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-642-35659-9

  • eBook Packages: Computer ScienceComputer Science (R0)