Verification of the EMMS Model with Pseudo-Particle Modeling

  • Jinghai Li
  • Wei Ge
  • Wei Wang
  • Ning Yang
  • Xinhua Liu
  • Limin Wang
  • Xianfeng He
  • Xiaowei Wang
  • Junwu Wang
  • Mooson Kwauk
Chapter

Abstract

A bottom-up simulation method, pseudo-particle modeling (PPM), is used to reproduce fluidization phenomena from first principles, that is, Newton’s laws of motion, and measure and analyze the energy dissipation in different systems. An asymptotic behavior in the energy consumed to transport and suspend particles per unit mass, N st, is observed in the evolution of the systems, thereby verifying the stability condition. The scale-dependence of this behavior is also studied, allowing the appropriate spatio-temporal range of the EMMS model to be defined. The behavior of the stability condition at different particle-fluid density ratios is also investigated.

Keywords

Discrete simulation  Gas-solid fluidization Pseudo-particle modeling Scale dependence Spatio-temporal compromise  Verification of EMMS  

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jinghai Li
    • 1
  • Wei Ge
    • 1
  • Wei Wang
    • 1
  • Ning Yang
    • 1
  • Xinhua Liu
    • 1
  • Limin Wang
    • 1
  • Xianfeng He
    • 1
  • Xiaowei Wang
    • 1
  • Junwu Wang
    • 1
  • Mooson Kwauk
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Process EngineeringChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China

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