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The Role of Category Label in Adults’ Inductive Reasoning

  • Xuyan Wang
  • Zhoujun Long
  • Sanxia Fan
  • Weiyan Yu
  • Haiyan Zhou
  • Yulin Qin
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7670)

Abstract

This study focused on two different views about the role of category label in inductive reasoning: perceptional-similarity-based and conception-based views. We used an inductive reasoning task, possibility judgment for a feature of artificial insect, to record behavioral performance in experiment 1 and brain activity with ERP in experiment 2. Two factors were manipulated: visual similarity of artificial insect, and whether with same label or not. The result suggests that the conception-based view is not supported here. The category label may enhance the perceptual characteristics, since labels have same visual and sound features; but it is hard to deny the role of conceptual information contained by a label to affect the inductive reasoning.

Keywords

Test Stimulus Inductive Reasoning Category Label Perceptual Characteristic Perceptual Similarity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xuyan Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhoujun Long
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sanxia Fan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Weiyan Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Haiyan Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yulin Qin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.International WIC InstituteBeijing University of TechnologyChina
  2. 2.Beijing Key Laboratory of MRI and Brain InformaticsChina
  3. 3.Dept. of PsychologyCarnegie Mellon UniversityUSA

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