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A Skill Learning during Heuristic Problem Solving: An fMRI Study

  • Zhoujun Long
  • Xuyan Wang
  • Xiangsheng Shen
  • Sanxia Fan
  • Haiyan Zhou
  • Yulin Qin
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7670)

Abstract

In order to investigate the skill learning of heuristics problem-solving, we took simplified 4×4 Sudoku as a new task. Brain activity was recorded when participants solved Sudoku problems with fMRI, and compared before and after plenty of practice. According to the adaptive control of thought-rational (ACT-R) model, we found that the activations in the areas of bilateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex decreased by extensive practice. It might indicate that the identification of the problem situation, the problem representation and efficiency of the declarative knowledge extraction were improved greatly in the skill learning of heuristic problem solving.

Keywords

Anterior Cingulate Cortex Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent Simple Task Posterior Parietal Cortex Problem Representation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhoujun Long
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xuyan Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiangsheng Shen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sanxia Fan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Haiyan Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yulin Qin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.International WIC InstituteBeijing University of TechnologyChina
  2. 2.Beijing Key Laboratory of MRI and Brain InformaticsChina
  3. 3.Dept. of PsychologyCarnegie Mellon UniversityUSA

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