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The Analysis of Eye Movements in the Context of Cognitive Technical Systems: Three Critical Issues

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNISA,volume 7403)

Abstract

Understanding mechanisms of attention is important in the context of research and application. Eye tracking is a promising method to approach this question, especially for the development of future cognitive technical systems. Based on three examples, we discuss aspects of eye gaze behaviour which are relevant for research and application. First, we demonstrate the omnipresent influence of sudden auditory and visual events on the duration of fixations. Second, we show that the correspondence between gaze direction and attention allocation is determined by characteristics of the task. Third, we explore how eye movements can be used for information transmission in remote collaboration by comparing it with verbal interaction and the mouse cursor. Analysing eye tracking in the context of future applications reveals a great potential but requires solid knowledge of the various facets of gaze behavior.

Keywords

  • eye movements
  • attention
  • fixation duration
  • remote collaboration

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Pannasch, S., Helmert, J.R., Müller, R., Velichkovsky, B.M. (2012). The Analysis of Eye Movements in the Context of Cognitive Technical Systems: Three Critical Issues. In: Esposito, A., Esposito, A.M., Vinciarelli, A., Hoffmann, R., Müller, V.C. (eds) Cognitive Behavioural Systems. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 7403. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-34584-5_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-34584-5_2

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-642-34583-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-642-34584-5

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