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Simulation of Constant Resistance Knee Flexion Movement

  • Chengzhu Zhu
  • Jian Jin
  • Yunhao Sun
  • Anbing Zheng
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 326)

Abstract

In the lower limb training process, incorrect training methods can’t improve the diathesis of lower limb, moreover, it may make injury to the body of athletes. With the development of sports biomechanics knowledge and computer modeling simulation technology, in the sports training practice coaches make use of human motion simulation methods to carry kinematics and dynamics simulation of athletes lower limb training so that the quantitative training indicators can be got to specific athlete. In this paper a novel human-computer modeling and simulating software—The Anybody Modeling System is adopted. Coupling modeling of human lower limb and training instrument is built, and simulation of training is made. The force status of lower limb muscles are analyzed in the process of constant resistance knee flexion movement, and the results provide a basis to develop quantitative training.

Keywords

biomechanics computer modeling and simulation man-machine coupling system constant resistance training mode 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chengzhu Zhu
    • 1
  • Jian Jin
    • 1
  • Yunhao Sun
    • 1
  • Anbing Zheng
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Mechatronic Engineering and AutomationShanghai UniversityShanghaiChina

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