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Pedestrian Indoor Localization Using Foot Mounted Inertial Sensors in Combination with a Magnetometer, a Barometer and RFID

  • Michailas Romanovas
  • Vadim Goridko
  • Lasse Klingbeil
  • Mohamed Bourouah
  • Ahmed Al-Jawad
  • Martin Traechtler
  • Yiannos Manoli
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC)

Abstract

A system for pedestrian indoor localization is presented, which uses the data of an inertial sensor unit mounted on the foot of a person walking through an indoor or outdoor environment. The inertial sensor data are integrated to a position/orientation information using a classical strapdown navigation approach, while several additional sensor data and constraints, such as Zero Velocity Updates, magnetometer and barometer readings and the detection of spatially distributed RFID tags, are incorporated to the solution using an Unscented Kalman Filter. The work presents a custom sensor system development, describes the developed algorithms and evaluates several methods to reduce the drift, which usually comes with the integration of low cost inertial sensors.

Keywords

Pedestrian localization Zero velocity update Unscented kalman filtering 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michailas Romanovas
    • 1
  • Vadim Goridko
    • 1
  • Lasse Klingbeil
    • 2
  • Mohamed Bourouah
    • 1
  • Ahmed Al-Jawad
    • 1
  • Martin Traechtler
    • 1
  • Yiannos Manoli
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Microsystems and Information TechnologyHahn-Schickard-Gesellschaft e.V.Villingen-SchwenningenGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Geodesy and GeoinformationRheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet BonnBonnGermany
  3. 3.Fritz Huettinger Chair of Microelectronics, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK)Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet FreiburgFreiburgGermany

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