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A Conceptual Model for Analyzing Contribution Patterns in the Context of VGI

  • Karl Rehrl
  • Simon Gröechenig
  • Hartwig Hochmair
  • Sven Leitinger
  • Renate Steinmann
  • Andreas Wagner
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC)

Abstract

The chapter proposes a conceptual model as foundation for analyzing user contributions in the context of VGI. The conceptual model is based on a set of action and domain concepts, which are combined to a task-model describing typical tasks of volunteered geographic information contribution. As a proof-of-concept, the model is applied to two sample data sets that are extracted from the OpenStreetMap (OSM) change history. OSM data samples provide a proof-of-concept concerning the applicability of the model for crowd activity analysis. The resulting “contribution graph”, which is a graph-like structure of linked editing actions, can be used as foundation for analyzing complex contribution patterns.

Keywords

VGI Crowd activity Contribution analysis Editing patterns Conceptual model 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karl Rehrl
    • 1
  • Simon Gröechenig
    • 2
  • Hartwig Hochmair
    • 3
  • Sven Leitinger
    • 1
  • Renate Steinmann
    • 1
  • Andreas Wagner
    • 1
  1. 1.Salzburg ResearchSalzburgAustria
  2. 2.Carinthia University of Applied ScienceVillachAustria
  3. 3.Fort Lauderdale Research and Education CenterUniversity of FloridaFort LauderdaleUSA

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