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Forensic Analysis of Pirated Chinese Shanzhai Mobile Phones

  • Junbin Fang
  • Zoe Jiang
  • Kam-Pui Chow
  • Siu-Ming Yiu
  • Lucas Hui
  • Gang Zhou
  • Mengfei He
  • Yanbin Tang
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 383)

Abstract

Mobile phone use – and mobile phone piracy – have increased dramatically during the last decade. Because of the profits that can be made, more than four hundred pirated brands of mobile phones are available in China. These pirated phones, referred to as “Shanzhai phones,” are often used by criminals because they are inexpensive and easy to obtain. However, the variety of pirated phones and the absence of documentation hinder the forensic analysis of these phones. This paper provides key details about the storage of the phonebook and call records in popular MediaTek Shanzhai mobile phones. This information can help investigators retrieve deleted call records and assist them in reconstructing the sequence of user activities.

Keywords

Chinese Shanzhai phones forensic analysis phonebook deleted data 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Junbin Fang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zoe Jiang
    • 3
  • Kam-Pui Chow
    • 2
  • Siu-Ming Yiu
    • 2
  • Lucas Hui
    • 2
  • Gang Zhou
    • 4
  • Mengfei He
    • 3
  • Yanbin Tang
    • 2
  1. 1.Guangdong Higher Education InstituteJinan UniversityGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  3. 3.School of Computer Science and Technology at Shenzhen Graduate SchoolHarbin Institute of TechnologyShenzhenChina
  4. 4.Computer Applications LaboratoryWuhan Engineering Science and Technology InstituteWuhanChina

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