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Mass Cultivation of Piriformospora indica and Sebacina Species

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Piriformospora indica

Part of the book series: Soil Biology ((SOILBIOL,volume 33))

Abstract

Symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Sebacinales can be easily mass multiplied on defined synthetic media. Piriformospora indica, the symbiotic fungi can be grown in a root of a living plant and under axenic culture. Scientists can take privilege of carrying out certain basic research to understand the molecular basis of plant–microbes interaction. Plant industries can produce Sebacinales under aseptic condition for commercial purposes and biological hardening of tissue-culture raised plants. Symbiotic fungi can be successfully cultivated on a wide range of synthetic solidified and broth media, e.g., MMN1/10, modified aspergillus, M4N, MMNC, MS, WPM, Malt–Yeast extract, PDA, and aspergillus. Among the tested the most optimum was aspergillus.

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Acknowledgment

Authors are thankful to DBT, DST, CSIR, ICAR, UGC, Government of India for partial financial assistance. Further authors are thankful to Dr. Michael Weiss, Germany for providing 28s rDNA analysis of P. indica.

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Correspondence to Anjana Singh .

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Singh, A., Rajpal, K., Singh, M., Kharkwal, A.C., Arora, M., Varma, A. (2013). Mass Cultivation of Piriformospora indica and Sebacina Species. In: Varma, A., Kost, G., Oelmüller, R. (eds) Piriformospora indica. Soil Biology, vol 33. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-33802-1_22

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