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Mobile Application for Noise Pollution Monitoring through Gamification Techniques

  • Irene Garcia Martí
  • Luis E. Rodríguez
  • Mauricia Benedito
  • Sergi Trilles
  • Arturo Beltrán
  • Laura Díaz
  • Joaquín Huerta
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7522)

Abstract

Full data coverage of urban environments is crucial to monitor the status of the area to detect, for instance, trends and detrimental environmental changes. Collecting observations related to environmental factors such as noise pollution in urban environments through classical approaches implies the deployment of Sensor Networks. The cost of deployment and maintenance of such infrastructure might be relatively high for local and regional governments. On the other hand recent mass-market mobile devices such as smartphones are full of sensors. For instance, it is possible to perform measurements of noise through its microphone. Therefore they become low-cost measuring devices that many citizens have in their pocket. In this paper we present an approach for gathering noise pollution data by using mobile applications. The applications are designed following gamification techniques to encourage users to participate using their personal smartphones. In this way the users are involved in taking and sharing noise pollution measurements in their cities that other stakeholders can use in their analysis and decision making processes.

Keywords

Gamification mobile applications environmental monitoring noise pollution PPGIS VGI 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irene Garcia Martí
    • 1
  • Luis E. Rodríguez
    • 1
  • Mauricia Benedito
    • 1
  • Sergi Trilles
    • 1
  • Arturo Beltrán
    • 1
  • Laura Díaz
    • 1
  • Joaquín Huerta
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of New Imaging Technologies (INIT)University Jaume I (UJI)Spain

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