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Semiautomatic and User-Centered Orientation of Digital Artifacts on Multi-touch Tabletops

  • Lorenz Barnkow
  • Kai von Luck
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7522)

Abstract

The orientation of objects on tables is of fundamental importance for the coordination, communication and proper understanding of content in group work. Similarly, the roles of orientation have to be taken into account when implementing software for multi-touch tabletops. This paper describes a combined approach to help with the orientation of artifacts, composed of both automatic and manual orientation methods. Using a custom test application, this study investigates the effects of automatic orientation of artifacts towards users.

Keywords

Multi-touch tabletops Orientation of artifacts territoriality group work 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorenz Barnkow
    • 1
  • Kai von Luck
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceHamburg University of Applied SciencesHamburgGermany

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