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Foredune Restoration in Urban Settings

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Restoration of Coastal Dunes

Part of the book series: Springer Series on Environmental Management ((SSEM))

Abstract

The ability to restore dunes on developed sandy shores depends on the beach width, the distance to human structures, human actions to trap or move sand, the tolerance of people to the dynamism of natural features, and the willingness to invest resources. Dunes can be built using earth-moving equipment, sand fences, vegetation planting or by allowing them to form by natural processes on beaches widened by artificial nourishment. The purpose of most dune-building efforts is to create a fixed barrier against natural coastal processes, but natural dunes are mobile and some element of dynamism should be favored in restoration efforts. Controls may be required to limit raking and driving on the beach, erecting sand fences and other structures, and planting vegetation so that portions of dunes evolve more naturally through time, while retaining their value as barriers against storm wave run-up. Attempts to create dunes where they do not exist or to increase the dynamism of stabilized dunes must have a strong public information component to demonstrate their feasibility and increase their acceptability.

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Correspondence to Karl F. Nordstrom .

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Nordstrom, K.F., Jackson, N.L. (2013). Foredune Restoration in Urban Settings. In: Martínez, M., Gallego-Fernández, J., Hesp, P. (eds) Restoration of Coastal Dunes. Springer Series on Environmental Management. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-33445-0_2

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