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Video Games and the Militarisation of Society: Towards a Theoretical and Conceptual Framework

  • Conference paper

Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT,volume 386)

Abstract

This paper outlines the relationship between military themed or oriented video and computer games and the process of militarisation. A theoretical and analytical framework which draws on elements of sociology, cultural studies and media analysis is required to help to understand the complex interplay between entertainment in the form of playable media, the military and the maintenance of Empire. At one level games can be described as simple forms of entertainment designed to engage players in a pleasurable fun activity. However, any form of media, whether playable or not, contains within it a set of ideological and political structures, meanings and ways of depicting the world. For the purpose of this paper playable media with a military theme or orientation will be described as political tools helping to shape the mental framework of players through the extension of a form of “military habitus”. Playable media with a military theme or orientation such as the Call of Duty series promote and facilitate the extension of the process of militarisation and impact on how players view the world. This worldview can have consequences for national security in promoting pro-war sentiments.

Keywords

  • empire
  • militarisation
  • video game

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Martino, J. (2012). Video Games and the Militarisation of Society: Towards a Theoretical and Conceptual Framework. In: Hercheui, M.D., Whitehouse, D., McIver, W., Phahlamohlaka, J. (eds) ICT Critical Infrastructures and Society. HCC 2012. IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, vol 386. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-33332-3_24

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-33332-3_24

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-642-33331-6

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