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Applying Digital Library Technologies to Nuclear Forensics

  • Electra Sutton
  • Chloe Reynolds
  • Fredric C. Gey
  • Ray R. Larson
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7489)

Abstract

Digital Libraries will enhance the value of forensic endeavors if they provide tools that enable data mining capabilities. In fact, collecting data without such tools can result in investigators becoming overwhelmed. Currently, the quantity of highly dangerous radioactive materials is increasing with the advancement of civilizations’ scientific inventions. This creates a demand for an equivalently sophisticated forensics capability that prevents misuse and brings malicious intent to justice. Our forensics approach applies digital library and data mining techniques. Specifically, the forensic investigator will utilize our digital library system which has been enhanced with advanced data mining query tools in order to determine attribution of material to their geographic sources and threat levels, enabling tracing and rating of smuggling activities.

Keywords

International Atomic Energy Agency Digital Library Nuclear Material Data Mining Technique Nuclear Fuel Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Electra Sutton
    • 1
  • Chloe Reynolds
    • 1
  • Fredric C. Gey
    • 1
  • Ray R. Larson
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Information and UC DataUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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