Introduction: Colors, Natural and Synthetic, in the Ancient World

Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR)

Abstract

Color is important. It gives life to everything people do, think, and even say. In the days when color television sets were expensive, and the corner bar was in sole possession of one, the neighborhood center became the corner bar. Color sensation is a universal human experience. From the beginning of recorded history, references to color abound in connection with every aspect of human life.

Keywords

Wall Painting Blue Pigment Dactylopius Coccus Rubia Tinctorum Synthetic Color 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ChemistryThe College of New RochelleNew RochelleUSA

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