Theorizing the European Union’s Global Authority: An Alternative Trichotomy

Chapter
Part of the Global Power Shift book series (GLOBAL)

Abstract

This chapter is a theoretical attempt to study the multifaceted authority of the European Union (EU) in world politics. Authority is legitimated power. Without legitimacy, power often faces severe resistance whereas legitimate actions and actorness imply less opposition if not widespread support. Informed by the thesis of Steven Lukes on three-dimensional power and Mark Suchman’s trichotomy of legitimacy, this chapter advances three dimensions of the EU’s authority in the world and discusses how the EU could maintain and/or restore its legitimacy in the global arena.

Keywords

European Union Candidate Country Moral Legitimacy European Union Membership Democracy Promotion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Politics and International RelationsRoyal Holloway University of LondonSurreyUK

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