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The Changing Context of Global Governance and the Normative Power of the European Union

  • Hanna Tuominen
Chapter
Part of the Global Power Shift book series (GLOBAL)

Abstract

The changing global order raises interesting questions about the future of the European Union’s global power. The EU expresses multiple types of power, but it has been most famously characterized as a normative power, having an ability to shape the ‘normality’ of global politics. The normative power argument has been much disputed, and there seems to be little agreement over its exact meaning. The conceptual vagueness makes it difficult to assess the future of the EU’s normative power. This chapter argues that normative power is about the promotion of universal normative principles and multilateral working methods. However, both of these elements are challenged by the emergence of a post-Western world order and the resurgence of more traditional realist power politics. Currently the EU has faced difficulties in shaping the global environment, and its normative power role has been unsettled. This chapter presents how the normative power concept is conditioned by external and internal factors that have changed the constellation over time. This “temporality” also explains the nature of the current challenges for normative power.

Keywords

European Union Normative Power Global Governance Soft Power Lisbon Treaty 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Network for European StudiesUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland

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