Educational Use of Computer Games: Where We Are, and What’s Next

  • Morris S. Y. Jong
  • Jimmy H. M. Lee
  • Junjie Shang
Part of the New Frontiers of Educational Research book series (NFER)

Abstract

This chapter aims at providing readers with a contextual view on educational use of computer games. Apart from the elaboration on the intrinsic educational traits of games, we introduce two recent initiatives of game-based learning (GBL), namely, “education in games” and “games in education,” and review a number of representative instances among each initiative. Last but not least, we discuss the current challenges of adopting games in education, and the areas worth further research effort so as to gain new insights into the future development of GBL.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Morris S. Y. Jong
    • 1
  • Jimmy H. M. Lee
    • 2
  • Junjie Shang
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Curriculum and InstructionThe Chinese University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  2. 2.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringThe Chinese University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  3. 3.Department of Education TechnologyPeking UniversityBeijingChina

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