On-line Trajectory Generation for Safe and Optimal Vehicle Motion Planning

  • Daniel Althoff
  • Martin Buss
  • Andreas Lawitzky
  • Moritz Werling
  • Dirk Wollherr
Conference paper
Part of the Informatik aktuell book series (INFORMAT)

Abstract

This paper presents a framework for motion planning of autonomous vehicles, it is characterized by its efficient computation and its safety guarantees. An optimal control based approach generates comfortable and physically feasible maneuvers of the vehicle. Therefore, a combined optimization of the lateral and longitudinal movements in street-relative coordinates with carefully chosen cost functionals and terminal state sets is performed. The collision checking of the trajectories during the planning horizon is also performed in street-relative coordinates. It provides continuous collision checking, which covers nearly all situations based on an algebraic solution and has a constant response time. Finally, the problem of safety assessment for partial trajectories beyond the planning horizon is addressed. Therefore, the Inevitable Collision States (ICS) are used, extending the safety assessment to an infinite time horizon. To solve the ICS computation nonlinear programming is applied. An example implementation of the proposed framework is applied to simulation scenarios that demonstrates its efficiency and safety capabilities.

Keywords

Planning Horizon Algebraic Solution Frenet Frame Infinite Time Horizon Autonomous Driving 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Althoff
    • 1
  • Martin Buss
    • 1
  • Andreas Lawitzky
    • 1
  • Moritz Werling
    • 2
  • Dirk Wollherr
    • 1
  1. 1.MünchenGermany
  2. 2.BMW Group Research and TechnologyMünchenGermany

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