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Mutual Interactions: Electric/Magnetic Fields and Strains

  • Roman Teisseyre
  • Maria Teisseyre-Jeleńska
Chapter
Part of the GeoPlanet: Earth and Planetary Sciences book series (GEPS)

Introduction

In this chapter we discuss interactions of the mechanical strain fields with the electric and magnetic fields; our intention was to achieve general forms of such interactions. This task may play a very important role in different problems, e.g., in the search of earthquake precursors. We present here an attempt to include a counterpart of the defects and a role of thermodynamical description of interaction processes. We include here the basic studies and achievements of the Professor P. Varotsos and his group exposing an essential role both for the thermodynamical aspects and in the transient variations of the electric field of the Earth as observed before the occurrence of major earthquakes. The achievements presented here give an important basis leading to a general form of the discussed interaction schema; that is, we present some general relations joining the electric and magnetic fields and also the electric polarization with the strains and deformations (e.g., the...

Keywords

Point Defect Applied Magnetic Field Earthquake Precursor Natural Time Polarization Gradient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of GeophysicsPolish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland

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