Advertisement

Direct Damping Apparatus

  • Junbo Jia
Chapter

Abstract

Originally used in the automobile industry to decrease the dynamic response and fatigue loading on vehicles, damping apparatuses have also been recognized as an effective technique to mitigate dynamic seismic (from 1990s) and wind induced (from 1960s) response for structures.

Keywords

Ground Motion Shape Memory Alloy Seismic Response Shake Table Test Viscous Damper 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Soong TT (1990) Active structural control: theory and practice. Longman Scientific & Sons Inc, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kelly JM (1990) Base isolation: linear theory and design. Earthq Spectra 6(2):223–244CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hanson RD, Aiken ID, Nims DK, Richter PJ, Bachman RE (1993) State-of-the-art and state-of-the-practice in seismic energy dissipation. Technical papers on passive energy dissipation, ATC-17–1, ATC, pp 449–471, March, 1993Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sadek F, Mohraz B, Taylor AW, Chung RM (1996) Passive energy dissipation devices for seismic applications, NISTIR 5923, National Institute of Standards and Technology, US Department of Commerce, Gaithersburg, MarylandGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Constantinou MC, Symans MD, Tsopelas P (1993) Fluid viscous dampers in applications of seismic energy dissipation and dissipation and seismic isolation. In: Proceedings of the ATC-17-1 seminar on seismic isolation, passive energy dissipation, and active control, San Francisco, March, 1993Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Symans MD, Constantinou MC (1998) Passive fluid viscous damping systems for seismic energy dissipation. J Earthq Technol 35(4):185–206Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Symans MD, Charney FA, Whittaker AS, Constantinou MC, Kircher CA, Johnson MW, McNamara RJ (2008) Energy dissipation systems for seismic applications: current practice and recent developments. J Struct EngASCE 134(1):3–21CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Filiatrault A, Tremblay R, Wanitkorkul A (2001) Performance evaluation of passive damping systems for the seismic retrofit of steel moment resisting frames subjected to near field ground motions. Earthq Spectra 17(3):427–456CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Taylor DP, Constantinou MC (1996) Fluid dampers for applications of seismic energy dissipation and seismic isolation. Taylor Devices Inc, North TonawandaGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Constantinou MC, Fujii S, Tsopelas P, Okamoto S (1992) University at Buffalo–Taisei Corporation research project on bridge seismic isolation system. In: Proceedings of the third NSF workshop on bridge engineering research in progress, La Jolla, CA, p 235Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Taylor DP (1996) Fluid dampers for applications of seismic energy dissipation and seismic isolation. In: Proceedings of 11th world conference on earthquake engineering, paper no. 798. Elsevier Science LtdGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Asher J, Young R, Ewing R (1994) Seismically damping—the San Bernardino County Medical Center, Structural Engineering Forum, pp 39–43Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Arima F, Tanaka H (1988) A study on buildings with large damping using viscous damping walls. In: Proceedings of the ninth world conference on earthquake engineering, vol 5. Tokyo-Kyoto, JapanGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Miyazaki M, MitsusakaY (1992) Design of a building with 20 % or greater damping. In: Proceedings of the 10th World conference on earthquake engineering, Madrid, pp 4143–4148Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Yeung N (2000) Viscous-damping walls for controlling wind-induced vibrations in buildings. PhD thesis, University of Hong KongGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Mahmoodi P, Robertson LE, Yontar M, Moy C, Feld L (1987) Performance of viscoelastic structural dampers in World Trade Center towers. Dynamics of Structures, Structures Congress ’87. Orlando, FLGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Aiken ID, Kelly JM (1990) Earthquake simulator testing and analytical studies of two energy absorbing systems for multistory structures. Report no. UCB/EERC-90/03, University of California, BerkeleyGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Constantinou MC, Symans MD (1993) Seismic response of structures with supplemental damping. Struct Des Tall Build 2:77–92CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Oh ST, Chang KC, Lai ML, Nielsen EJ (1992) Seismic response of viscoelastically damped structure under strong earthquake ground motions. In: Proceedings of the 10th world conference on earthquake engineering, Madrid, SpainGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Chang KC, Soong TT, Oh ST, Lai ML (1992) Effect of ambient temperature on a viscoelastically damped structure. J Struct Eng ASCE 118(7):1955–1973CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
  22. 22.
    Hsu SY, Fafitis A (1992) Seismic analysis and design of frames with viscoelastic connections. J Struct Eng ASCE 118(9):2459–2474CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Hsu SY, Fafitis A (1992) Seismic analysis of frames with viscoelastic beam-column connections. In: Proceedings of 10th world conference on earthquake engineering, Balkema, RotterdamGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Shen KL, Soong TT (1995) Modeling of viscoelastic dampers for structural applications. J Eng Mech ASCE 121(6):694–701CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Abbas H, Kelly JM (1993) A methodology for design of viscoelastic dampers in earthquake-resistant structures. Report no. UCB/EERC 93/09, Earthquake Engineering Research Center, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CAGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Zhang RH, Soong TT (1992) Seismic design of viscoelastic dampers for structural applications. J Struct Eng ASCE 118(5):1375–1392CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Chang KC, Lai ML, Soong TT, Hao DD, Yeh YC (1993) Seismic behavior and design guidelines for steel frame structures with added viscoelastic dampers, NCEER 93-009. National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, Buffalo, NYGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Shen KL, Soong TT (1996) Design of energy dissipation devices based on concept of damage control. J Struct Eng ASCE 122(1):76–82CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Park YJ, Ang AHS (1985) Mechanistic seismic damage model for reinforced concrete. J Struct Eng ASCE 111(4):722–739CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Samali B, Kwok KCS (1995) Use of viscoelastic dampers in reducing wind- and earthquake-induced motion of building structures. Eng Struct 17(9):639–654CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Filiatrault A, Cherry S (1987) Performance evaluation of friction damped braced steel frames under simulated earthquake loads. Earthq Spectra 3(1)Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Aiken ID, Kelly JM (1988) Experimental study of friction damping for steel frame structures. In: Proceedings of the PVP conference, vol 133, ASME, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pp 95–100Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Hakimi BE, Rahnavard A, Honarbakhsh T (2004) Seismic design of structures using friction damper bracings. In: 13th world conference on earthquake engineering, VancouverGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Pall AS, Marsh C (1982) Response of friction damped braced frames. J Struct Eng ASCE 108(6):1313–1323Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Pall AS, Verganelakis V, Marsh C (1987) Friction dampers for seismic control of Concordia University library building. In: Proceedings of the fifth Canadian conference on earthquake engineering, Ottawa, Canada, pp 191–200Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Colajanni P, Papia M (1995) Seismic response of braced frames with and without friction dampers. Eng Struct 17(2):129–140CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. 37.
    Kareem A, Kijewski T, Tamura Y (1999) Mitigation of motions of tall buildings with specific examples of recent applications. Perception 2(3):48Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Aiken ID, Kelly JM, Pall AS (1988) Seismic response of a nine-story steel frame with friction damped cross-bracing, report no. UCB/EERC-88/17, EERC, University of California BerkeleyGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Pasquin C, Leboeuf N, Pall RT, Pall A (2004) Friction dampers for seismic rehabilitation of Eaton’s Building, Montreal. In: 13th world conference on earthquake engineering, VancouverGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    Filiatrault A, Cherry S (1986) Seismic tests of friction-damped steel frames. In: Third conference on dynamic response of structures. ASCE, Los AngelesGoogle Scholar
  41. 41.
    Grigorian CE, Yang TS, Popov EP (1993) Slotted bolted connection energy dissipaters. Earthq Spectra 9(3):491–504CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. 42.
    Soong TT, Dargush GF (1997) Passive energy dissipation systems in structural engineering. Wiley, ChichesterGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    Nims DK, Inaudi JA, Richter PJ, Kelly JM (1993) Application of the energy dissipating restraint to buildings. In: Proceedings of the ATC 17-1 on seismic isolation, energy dissipation, and active control, pp 627–638Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Choi E, Choi G, Kim TH, Youn H (2015) Smart damper using the combination of magnetic friction and precompressed rubber springs. J Sound Vib 351:68–89CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    Choi E, Kim T, Youn H, Jeon J-S (2016) Vibration tests of precompressed rubber springs and a flag-shaped smart damper. Eng StructGoogle Scholar
  46. 46.
    Mualla IH, Nielsen LO (2002) A friction damping system low order behavior and design. Department of Civil Engineering, Danmarks Tenniske University, BygningGoogle Scholar
  47. 47.
    Komachi Y, Tabeshpour MR, Golafshani AA, Mualla I (2011) Retrofit of Ressalat jacket platform (Persina Gulf) using friction damper device. J Zhejiang Univ Sci A 12(9):680–691CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. 48.
    Pall A, Pall RT (2004) Performance-based design using Pall friction dampers—an economical design solution. In: Proceedings of the 13th world conference on earthquake engineering, VancouverGoogle Scholar
  49. 49.
  50. 50.
    Malhotra A, Carson D, Gopal P, Braimah A, Giovanni GD, Pall R (2004) Friction dampers for seismic upgrade of St. Vincent Hospital, Ottawa. In: Proceedings of the 13th world conference on earthquake engineering, Vancouver, BC, CanadaGoogle Scholar
  51. 51.
    Nikam SG, Wagholikar SK, Patil GR (2014) Seismic energy dissipation of a building using friction damper. Int J Innov Technol Explor Eng 3(10)Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    Pasquin C, Leboeuf N, Pall RT, Pall A (2004) Friction dampers for seismic rehabilitation of Eaton’s Building, Montreal. In: 13th world conference on earthquake engineering, Vancouver, paper no. 1949Google Scholar
  53. 53.
  54. 54.
    Tabeshpour MR, Ebrahimian H (2010) Seismic retrofit of existing structures using friction. Asian J Civil Eng 11(4):509–520Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    Pall AS, Pall R (1996) Friction-dampers for seismic control of buildings: a Canadian experience. In: 11th world conference on earthquake engineeringGoogle Scholar
  56. 56.
    Kelly JM, Skinner RI, Heine AJ (1972) Mechanisms of energy absorption in special devices for use in earthquake-resistant structures. Bull N Z Natl Soc Earthq Eng 5(3):63–88Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    Roeder CW, Popov EP (1978) Eccentrically braced steel frames for earthquakes. J Struct Div ASCE 104(3):391–412Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    Tyler RG (1985) Further notes on a steel energy absorbing element for braced frameworks. Bull N Z Natl Soc Earthq Eng 18(3):270–279Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    Tsai KC, Hong CP (1992) Steel triangular plate energy absorber for earthquake-resistant buildings. In: Proceedings of the first world congress on constructional steel design, MexicoGoogle Scholar
  60. 60.
    Tagawa H, Gao J (2012) Evaluation of vibration control system with U-dampers based on quasi-linear motion mechanism. J Constr Steel Res 70:213–225CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. 61.
    Kang JD, Tagawa H (2013) Seismic response of steel structures with seesaw systems using viscoelastic dampers. Earthq Eng Struct Dyn 42(5):779–794CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. 62.
    Tagawa H, Yamanishi T, Takaki A, Chan RWK (2016) Cyclic behavior of seesaw energy dissipation system with steel slit dampers. J Constr Steel Res 117:24–34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. 63.
    Chan R, Wong PSP (2014) A passive rotary system for seismic risk mitigation of steel structures. Australas J Constr Econ Build Conf Ser 2(2):72–79Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    Fortney PJ, Shahrooz BM, Rassati GA (2007) Large-scale testing of a replaceable “fuse” steel coupling beam. J Struct Eng 133(12):1801–1807CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. 65.
    Lu X, Mao Y, Chen Y, Zhou Y (2014) Earthquake resilience of tall buildings using replaceable energy dissipation members. In: 10th US national conference on earthquake engineering, Anchorage, AlaskaGoogle Scholar
  66. 66.
    Holden T, Restrepo JI, Mander JB (2003) Seismic performance of precast reinforced and pre-stressed concrete walls. J Struct Eng ASCE 129(3):286–296CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. 67.
    Restrepo JI, Rahman A (2007) Seismic performance of self-centering structural walls incorporating energy dissipators. J Struct Eng ASCE 133(11):1560–1570CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. 68.
    Chung HS, Moon BW, Lee SK, Park JJ, Min KW (2009) Seismic performance of friction dampers using flexure of RC shear wall system. Struct Des Tall Spec Build 18(7):807–822CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. 69.
    Lyons RM, Christopoulos C, Montgomery MS (2012) Enhancing the seismic performance of RC coupled wall high-rise buildings with viscoelastic coupling dampers. In: Proceedings of 15th world conference on earthquake engineering, LisbonGoogle Scholar
  70. 70.
    Ishii M, Uehira S, Ogi Y, Morishita K (2005) Hysteresis dampers for controlling seismic response of bridges and structures, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Technical review, vol 42, no 1Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    Nikkei Architecture (1997) Art Hotel Sapporo, two thousand hysteretic dampers reduce 20 % steel weight, no. 588, pp 202–205 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    Li G, Li H (2008) Earthquake-resistant design of RC frame with “dual function” metallic dampers. In: Proceedings of the 14th world conference on earthquake engineering, BeijingGoogle Scholar
  73. 73.
    Robinson WH, Consins WJ (1982) Recent developments in lead dampers for base isolation. In: Pacific conference on earthquake engineering, vol 2, pp 2279–2283, New ZealandGoogle Scholar
  74. 74.
    Charleson AW, Wright PD, Skinner RI (1987) Wellington Central Police Station, based isolation of an essential facility. In: Proceedings of the Pacific conference on earthquake engineering, vol 2, NXGoogle Scholar
  75. 75.
    Duerig TW (ed) (1990) Engineering aspect of shape memory alloys. Butterworth-Heinemann Ltd, LondonGoogle Scholar
  76. 76.
    Dolce M, Cardone D (2001) Mechanical behaviour of shape memory alloys for seismic applications; austenite NiTi wires subjected to tension. Int J Mech Sci 43(11):2657–2677CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. 77.
    Saadat S, Salichs J, Noori M, Hou Z, Davoodi H, Bar-on I, Suzuki Y, Masuda A (2002) An overview of vibration and seismic application of NiTi shape memory alloy. Smart Mater Struct 11:218–229CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. 78.
    Van der Eijk C, Zhang ZL, Akselsen OM (2004) Seismic dampers based on shape memory alloys: metallurgical background and modeling. In: Proceedings of the third European conference on structural control, 3ECSC, Vienna, Austria, 12–15 July, pp M1–5Google Scholar
  79. 79.
    Song G, Ma N, Li HN (2006) Applications of shape memory alloys in civil structures. Eng Struct 28(9):1266–1274CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. 80.
    Dolce M, Cardone D, Nigro D (2000) Experimental tests on seismic devices based on shape memory alloys. In: Proceedings of the 12th world conference on earthquake engineering, Auckland, New Zealand, p 8Google Scholar
  81. 81.
    Dolce M, Marnetto R (2000) Passive seismic devices based on shape memory alloys. In: Proceedings of the 12th world conference on earthquake engineering, Auckland, New ZealandGoogle Scholar
  82. 82.
    Dolce M, Marnetto R (1999) Seismic devices based on shape memory alloys. In: Proceedings of the final workshop of the BRITE-MANSIDE (memory alloys for new seismic isolation devices) project, Rome, Italy, p 28Google Scholar
  83. 83.
    Han YL, Xing DJ, Xiao ET, Li AQ (2005) NiTi-wire shape memory alloy dampers to simultaneously damp tension, compression, and torsion. J Vib Control 11(8):1067–1084CrossRefzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  84. 84.
    Clark PW, Aiken ID, Kelly JM, Higashino M, Krumme R (1995) Experimental and analytical studies of shape-memory alloy dampers for structural control. Proc SPIE 2445:241CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. 85.
    Olsen JS (2006) Seismic dampers with composite NiTi wires: a new damper system. MSc thesis, Norwegian University of Science and TechnologyGoogle Scholar
  86. 86.
    van der Eijk C, Olsen JS, Zhang Z (2007) Applications of NiTi shape memory alloy dampers in civil structures. In: Proceedings of the first international conference on self healing materials, Noordwijk aan Zee, NetherlandGoogle Scholar
  87. 87.
    Constantinou MC, Symans MD (1992) Experimental and analytical investigation of seismic response of structures with supplemental fluid viscous dampers, NCEER 92-0032. National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, Buffalo, NYGoogle Scholar
  88. 88.
    Ji T, Bell a (2008) Seeing and touching structural concepts. Taylor & Francis, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  89. 89.
    Meiliang W, Qian J (2003) Research and application of viscous damping walls. Ind Constr 33(5):61–65Google Scholar
  90. 90.
    Jia Junbo (2014) Essentials of applied dynamic analysis. Springer, HeidelbergCrossRefzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  91. 91.
    Fitzgerald TF, Anagnos T, Goodson M, Zsutty T (1989) Slotted bolted connections in aseismic design of concentrically braced connections. Earthq Spectra 5(2):383–391CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. 92.
    Mirtaheri M, Zandi AP, Samadi SS, Samani HR (2011) Numerical and experimental study of hysteretic behavior of cylindrical friction dampers. Eng Struct 33:3647–3656CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. 93.
    Richter PJ, Nims DK, Kelly JM, Kallenbach RM (1990) The DER energy dissipating restraint, a new device for mitigation of seismic effects. In: Proceedings of the SEAOC 59th annual convention, Lake TahoeGoogle Scholar
  94. 94.
    Whittaker AS, Bertero VV, Alonso JL, Thompson CL (1989) Earthquake simulator testing of steel plate added damping and stiffness elements. Report no. UCB/EERC-89/02, University of California, BerkeleyGoogle Scholar
  95. 95.
    Whittaker AS, Bertero VV, Thompson CL, Alonso LJ (1991) Seismic testing of steel plate energy dissipation devices. Earthq Spectra 7(4):563–604CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. 96.
    Skinner RI, Robinson WH, McVerry GH (1993) An introduction to seismic isolation. Wiley, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  97. 97.
    Symans MD, Charney FA, Whittaker AS, Constantinou MC, Kircher CA, Johnson MW, McNamara RJ (2008) Energy dissipation systems for seismic applications: current practice and recent developments. J Struct Eng ASCE 134(1):3–21CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Aker SolutionsBergenNorway

Personalised recommendations