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Accessibility for the Blind on an Open-Source Mobile Platform

MObile Slate Talker (MOST) for Android
  • Norbert Markus
  • Szabolcs Malik
  • Zoltan Juhasz
  • András Arató
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7383)

Abstract

As Android handsets keep flooding the shops in a wide range of prices and capabilities, many of the blind community turn their attention to this emerging alternative, especially because of a plethora of cheaper models offered. Earlier, accessibility experts only recommended Android phones sporting an inbuilt QWERTY keyboard, as the touch-screen support had then been in an embryotic state. Since late 2011, with Android 4.X (ICS), this has changed. However, most handsets on the market today -especially the cheaper ones- ship with a pre-ICS Android version. This means that their visually impaired users won’t be able to enjoy the latest accessibility innovations. Porting MObile SlateTalker to Android has been aimed at filling this accessibility gap with a low-cost solution, regarding the special needs of our target audience: the elderly, persons with minimal tech skills and active Braille users.

Keywords

(e)Accessibility Blind People Assistive Technology Braille Usability and Ergonomics (e)Aging and Gerontechnology Mobility Android 

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References

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    Arato, A., Juhasz, Z., Blenkhorn, P., Evans, G., Evreinov, G.: Java-Powered Braille Slate Talker. In: Miesenberger, K., Klaus, J., Zagler, W.L., Burger, D. (eds.) ICCHP 2004. LNCS, vol. 3118, pp. 506–513. Springer, Heidelberg (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norbert Markus
    • 1
  • Szabolcs Malik
    • 1
  • Zoltan Juhasz
    • 2
  • András Arató
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Speech Technology for Rehabilitation, Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Wigner Research Centre for PhysicsHungarian Academy of SciencesBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Dept of Electrical Engineering and Information SystemsUniversity of PannoniaVeszpremHungary

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