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SignMedia

Interactive English Learning Resource for Deaf Sign Language Users Working in the Media Industry
  • Luzia Gansinger
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7383)

Abstract

An increasing number of deaf graduates and professionals enter media related careers. In the media industry it is a common practice to communicate in written English. Since English discourse can prove a barrier to sign language users, the interactive learning resource SignMedia teaches written English through national sign languages. Learners immerse in a virtual media environment where they perform tasks taken from various stages of the production process of a TV series to reinforce their English skills at intermediate level. By offering an accessible English for Specific Purposes (ESP) course for the media industry, the SignMedia learning tool supports career progression of deaf media professionals.

Keywords

sign language e-learning accessibility ICT multimedia EFL/ESL ESP 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luzia Gansinger
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Sign Language and Deaf CommunicationUniversity of KlagenfurtKlagenfurtAustria

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