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Methodological Aspects

  • Marcus Brandenburg
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Economics and Mathematical Systems book series (LNE, volume 660)

Abstract

This sections comprises a formulation of the research questions of this dissertation and outlines the chosen research approach and how it is reflected by the structure of the thesis. Additionally, the coherence of its chapters is described. Furthermore, conceptual elements are defined and a conceptual framework for value-based SCM is designed as a basis for the quantitative models proposed in the thesis at hand.

Keywords

Cash Flow Quantitative Research Conceptual Element Business Game Financial Principle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcus Brandenburg
    • 1
  1. 1.Chair of Supply Chain ManagementUniversity of KasselKasselGermany

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