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Controlled Ventilation of Historic Buildings: Assessment of Impact on the Indoor Environment via Hygrothermal Building Simulation

  • Florian AntretterEmail author
  • Sarah Kosmann
  • Ralf Kilian
  • Andreas Holm
  • Fabian Ritter
  • Barbara Wehle
Chapter
Part of the Building Pathology and Rehabilitation book series (BUILDING, volume 1)

Abstract

Historic buildings, when they are unheated, often face problems of summer condensation. After the cold season warm, humid air enters the building and condenses on the walls, a problem that can occur during the entire warm season. This leads to moisture related problems such as mould or algae growth on building surfaces. High humidity can also damage works of art inside the building. One possibility to lower the level of relative humidity is to ventilate the building every time when the dewpoint outdoors is lower than indoors. On the other hand, the resulting humidity fluctuations may also cause damages on works of art and bringing in cold air will further lower the temperatures of the whole building and its walls thus being counter productive to the drying process. An automatic system for ventilating historic, unheated buildings is assessed using building simulation software (WUFI®Plus) on two case studies, the St. Margaretha church in Roggersdorf, near Holzkirchen, Germany and the Gatehall of Lorsch, Germany.

Keywords

Historic building Controlled ventilation Hygrothermal whole building simulation Summer condensation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is part of the European research project “Climate for Culture” (contract nr. 226973) on the impacts of Global Climate Change on Cultural Heritage that is funded by the European Commission.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Florian Antretter
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sarah Kosmann
    • 1
  • Ralf Kilian
    • 1
  • Andreas Holm
    • 2
  • Fabian Ritter
    • 1
  • Barbara Wehle
    • 1
  1. 1.Fraunhofer-Institut für BauphysikHolzkirchenGermany
  2. 2.University of Applied Sciences MunichGermany

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