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Fictive Motion Down Under: The Locative-Allative Case Alternation in Some Australian Indigenous Languages

  • Patrick McConvell
  • Jane Simpson

Abstract

This paper describes the predication of location of participants in Indigenous languages of northern Central Australia. Two main strategies are discussed: the use of double case-marking, and the co-opting of particular local cases to express scope of predication as well as location. The coopting case in question involves the Allative Nominal Construction (AN). This is the use of an allative case instead of a locative case in the meaning of ‘static location’ in a secondary predication where the subject of that predication has the same reference as an object or oblique in the main predication.

Keywords

Semantic Role Transitive Verb Grammatical Function Water Hole Secondary Predication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

It is a pleasure to offer this paper in honour of Lauri Carlson, whose paper on Finnish case (Nordlinger 1998) remains a classic. Earlier versions of this paper were presented at the PIONIER Workshop on Locative Case, 25–26 August 2008, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, the Research Centre for Linguistic Typology, La Trobe University, 9 February 2011, the Aboriginal Languages Workshop, Stradbroke Island, 11–13 March 2011, and as a seminar in the Department of Linguistics, University of Helsinki (31 October 2011). Thanks to the organisers and participants for comments, and to Barry Blake, Gavan Breen, Lauri Carlson, Diana Forker, Mary Laughren, David Nash, Rachel Nordlinger, Nicholas Ostler, Anne Tamm, and David Wilkins for sharing data and comments. We thank referees, and special thanks to Aet Lees for enlightening discussion of Estonian and Finnish.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick McConvell
    • 1
  • Jane Simpson
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Language StudiesAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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