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Dynamics and Control of a Snake Robot Rectilinear Motion

  • Alexander Gmiterko
  • Michal Kelemen
  • Ivan Virgala
  • Róbert Surovec
  • Martina Vacková
  • Erik Prada
Part of the Topics in Intelligent Engineering and Informatics book series (TIEI, volume 2)

Abstract

The paper deals with a snake robot rectilinear motion on the flat surface. At first, biological snake rectilinear motion observed in the nature is introduced. Based on this the transformation of biological snake body to the mechanical system is established. After pattern gait design and motion conditions introduction the mathematical model of snake robot rectilinear motion is established. Subsequently an average velocity of motion is derived. From the equation of average velocity the optimal number of masses is derived in order to maximum system velocity. The average velocity courses for different pairs of materials in the graph are shown. In the next section a feedback control system for masses displacement is introduced. For this purpose PD regulator is used. In conclusion the summary of study and simulation are done.

Keywords

Friction Coefficient Friction Model Feedback Control System Propulsive Force Rectilinear Motion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Gmiterko
    • 1
  • Michal Kelemen
    • 1
  • Ivan Virgala
    • 1
  • Róbert Surovec
    • 1
  • Martina Vacková
    • 1
  • Erik Prada
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Mechanical Engineering/Department of Applied Mechanics and MechatronicsTechnical University of KošiceKošiceSlovakia

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