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Improving the Development of Surgical Skills with Virtual Fixtures in Simulation

  • Albert Hernansanz
  • Davide Zerbato
  • Lorenza Gasperotti
  • Michele Scandola
  • Paolo Fiorini
  • Alicia Casals
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7330)

Abstract

This paper focuses on the use of virtual fixtures to improve the learning of basic skills for laparoscopic surgery. Five virtual fixtures are defined, integrated into a virtual surgical simulator and used to define an experimental setup based on a trajectory following task.

46 subjects among surgeons and residents underwent a training session based on the proposed setup. Their performance has been logged and used to identify the effect of virtual fixtures on the learning curve from the point of view of accuracy and completion time.

Virtual fixtures prove to be effective in improving the learning and affect differently accuracy and completion time. This suggests the possibility to tailor virtual fixtures on the specific task requirements.

Keywords

Completion Time Robotic Surgery Surgical Skill Assistive Technology Force Feedback 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert Hernansanz
    • 1
    • 2
  • Davide Zerbato
    • 3
  • Lorenza Gasperotti
    • 3
  • Michele Scandola
    • 3
  • Paolo Fiorini
    • 3
  • Alicia Casals
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC)Spain
  2. 2.Technical University of Catalonia BarcelonaTech (UPC)Spain
  3. 3.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of VeronaItaly

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