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Experimentation on Animals

  • Edward N. Eadie
Chapter
Part of the Animal Welfare book series (AWNS, volume 13)

Abstract

The number of animals used in laboratories for experimentation and routine testing of industrial products and medicines has grown rapidly in recent years. Fortunately the University Federation of Animal Welfare had the foresight to sponsor two scientists, Wiliam Russell and Rex Burch, to study methods of improving the management of laboratory animals to achieve a better welfare outcome. The results of their study were published in a book that quickly became recognised as the authoritative work on the topic. The book introduces the concept of the ‘3R’s (Reduction in numbers, Replacement by alternatives, and Refinement of conditions for the animals). This approach was subsequently adopted by many laboratory animal scientists wordwide. The importance of this and other key texts in this field is discussed, alongside the scenario of growth in laboratory animal numbers and changing use patterns.

Keywords

Animal Welfare Personal Commitment Animal Suffering Proper Application Abridge Version 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Glenelg NorthAustralia

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