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The Electrochemical Oxidation of HSAC Catalyst Supports

  • Sean James Ashton
Chapter
Part of the Springer Theses book series (Springer Theses, volume 8)

Abstract

A fundamental understanding of the electrochemical oxidation behaviour of carbon blacks used to support finely dispersed Pt particles is crucial to the design of mitigating strategies that prevent the deterioration of PEMFC performance, particularly in automotive applications. In this study, DEMS is utilised to investigate and compare the electrochemical oxidation tendencies of a pristine EC300 carbon black and five graphitised carbon blacks (heat-treated between 2,100 and 3,200 °C). The study is then briefly extended to EC300 HSAC supported Pt nanoparticle catalysts. By monitoring the CO2 and O2 produced in situ, it is possible to elucidate the contributions of the different electrochemical reactions to the overall faradaic electrode current observed during high potential excursions >1.35 VRHE. The initial partial and complete electrochemical oxidation of EC300 was found to be considerably greater than the graphitised samples. However, during repeated potential excursions the electrochemical oxidation tendencies were observed to be dynamic, exhibiting three trends that are not only influenced by the amount of electrochemical oxidation but also the lower electrode potential limit. Finally, the behaviour of the EC300 HSAC supported Pt catalysts was found to be largely the same as the pure EC300 carbon black, however, an additional peak is observed after electrochemical oxidation attributed to the oxidation of CO species on Pt.

Keywords

Carbon Black Electrochemical Oxidation Surface Functional Group Oxygen Evolution Reaction Electrode Current 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sean James Ashton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark

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