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Unification, War, and the New York City Transit Authority

  • Roger P. Roess
  • Gene Sansone
Part of the Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic book series (STTT, volume 1)

Abstract

By the time the Independent Subway’s Eighth Avenue line was opened to the public in 1932, the economics of public transportation had radically changed. Anchored to a political policy of retaining the five-cent fare, public transportation, and rapid transit in particular, were doomed to be money-losing enterprises. It was clear that it was necessary for the city to provide massive funding to keep the system running, and that private entrepreneurs were no longer trying to get into the business. Those that were still in it, the IRT and the BMT, were looking for ways to get out. Between 1932 and 1953, the city would struggle to determine an effective means of dealing with the responsibility of providing and operating public transportation.

Keywords

York Time Slot Machine Transit System District Attorney Special Election 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Transportation EngineeringPolytechnic Institute of New York UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.MTA New York City TransitPolytechnic Institute of New York University New YorkUSA

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