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Abstract

Tangible user interfaces allow children to take advantage of their experience in the real world with multimodal human interactions when interacting with digital information. In this paper we describe a model for tangible user interfaces that focuses mainly on the user experience during interaction. This model is related to other models and used to design a multi-touch tabletop application for a museum. We report about our first experiences with this museum application.

Keywords

tangible user interfaces multi-touch table tabletop information access children 

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Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Science, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Betsy van Dijk
    • 1
  • Frans van der Sluis
    • 1
  • Anton Nijholt
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Media InteractionUniversity of TwenteEnschedeThe Netherlands

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