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The Socioeconomic Impact of Energy Security in Southeast Asia

Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace book series (BRIEFSSECUR, volume 1)

Abstract

This chapter aims to analyse some of the energy security issues facing ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) countries and their socioeconomic impacts, in the context of developments in the global energy markets. ASEAN countries subscribe to the core strategies of the development of new sources, diversification of supply and greater use of renewables; promotion of competitive markets; greater energy efficiency in use; and regional cooperation, trade in energy goods and services, and cross-country investments. Key challenges are the reduction of fossil fuel subsidies and improving access to modern energy services. The adoption of renewable energy in the region is hampered by its high cost.

Keywords

ASEAN Biofuels Electricity Energy security Energy self-sufficiency Fossil fuel subsidies Modern energy services Regional cooperation Renewable energy Socioeconomic impacts 

Abbreviations

ADB

Asian Development Bank

APG

ASEAN Power Grid

APSA

ASEAN Petroleum Security Agreement

ASCOPE

ASEAN Council on Petroleum

ASEAN

Association of Southeast Asian Nations

Btu

British thermal unit

CCT

Conditional cash transfer

CNG

Compressed natural gas

CSPS

Centre for Strategic and Policy Studies

DSWD

Department of Social Welfare and Development, Republic of the Philippines

FIT

Feed-in-tariffs

GDP

Gross domestic product

GHG

Greenhouse gas

GMS

Greater Mekong Subregion

GST

Government service tax

HDB

Housing and Development Board

IMF

International Monetary Fund

kWh

Kilowatts hour

LIHD

Low-input high-diversity

LPG

Liquefied petroleum gas

MW

Megawatts

NCR

National Capital Region

NPC

National Power Corporation

NREB

National Renewable Energy Board

NREL

National Renewable Energy Laboratory

OECD

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

PPP

Purchasing power parity

R&D

Research and development

SIIA

Singapore Institute of International Affairs

SPUG

Small Power Utilities Group

TAGP

Trans ASEAN Gas Pipeline

toe

Tons of oil equivalent

UNDP

United Nations Development Programme

UNESCAP

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific

US

United States

U-Save

Utilities-Save

VAT

Value-added tax

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EconomicsUniversity of the Philippines (Diliman)Quezon CityThe Philippines

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