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Culture-Negative Infections in Orthopedic Surgery

  • G. D. Ehrlich
  • Patrick DeMeo
  • Michael Palmer
  • T. J. Sauber
  • Dan Altman
  • Greg Altman
  • Nick Sotereanos
  • Stephen Conti
  • Mark Baratz
  • Gerhard Maale
  • Fen Z. Hu
  • J. Christopher Post
  • Laura Nistico
  • Rachael Kreft
  • Luanne Hall-Stoodley
  • J. W. Costerton
  • Paul Stoodley
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Biofilms book series (BIOFILMS, volume 7)

Abstract

Laboratory cultures are the main scientific input into the decision-making process that determines the course of treatment for suspected orthopedic infections, just as they constitute the mainstay of the diagnosis of infections in other medical specialties. This situation is archaic because culture techniques were virtually abandoned in Environmental Microbiology (Hugenholtz et al. 1998) many years ago, following the conclusion that <1% of the bacteria in any natural ecosystem can be recovered by standard cultural methods. Medical Microbiology has clung to culture techniques because they detect the bacteria that cause acute infections, with reasonable sensitivity and accuracy, but the time has come to examine both their sensitivity and their accuracy for the detection and identification of bacteria in chronic biofilm infections (Costerton et al. 1999).

Keywords

Otitis Medium With Effusion Vaginal Flora Multicellular Aggregate Base Ratio Chronic Bacterial Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. D. Ehrlich
    • 1
  • Patrick DeMeo
    • 2
  • Michael Palmer
    • 2
  • T. J. Sauber
    • 2
  • Dan Altman
    • 2
  • Greg Altman
    • 2
  • Nick Sotereanos
    • 2
  • Stephen Conti
    • 2
  • Mark Baratz
    • 2
  • Gerhard Maale
    • 3
  • Fen Z. Hu
    • 1
  • J. Christopher Post
    • 1
  • Laura Nistico
    • 1
  • Rachael Kreft
    • 1
  • Luanne Hall-Stoodley
    • 4
  • J. W. Costerton
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paul Stoodley
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Genomic Sciences, Allegheny-Singer Research InstitutePittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryAllegheny General HospitalPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Dallas Ft. Worth Sarcoma GroupDallasUSA
  4. 4.University of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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