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Blunt-Force Trauma: Bruises

  • Robert A. C. Bilo
  • Arnold P. Oranje
  • Tor Shwayder
  • Christopher J. Hobbs
Chapter

Abstract

In humans, the skin is the most visible organ, and it is also the most frequently damaged organ when children sustain injuries. The injuries most commonly seen are bruises and abrasions. These injuries are usually the result of everyday activities at home, including play, sports, or during participating in traffic. In most cases, a skin injury is the only abnormality. However, sometimes an external injury is an indication for more serious internal damage (the “tip of the iceberg” phenomenon).

Keywords

Physical Assault Open Hand Yellow Discoloration Acute Kidney Failure Oral Commissure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert A. C. Bilo
    • 1
  • Arnold P. Oranje
    • 2
  • Tor Shwayder
    • 3
  • Christopher J. Hobbs
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Forensic MedicineNetherlands Forensic InstituteThe HagueNetherlands
  2. 2.Department of Paediatric DermatologyErasmus MC - SophiaRotterdamNetherlands
  3. 3.Department of DermatologyHenry Ford HospitalDetroitUSA
  4. 4.St. James’s University HospitalLeedsUK

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