Optimization of a Regional Climate Model for High Resolution Simulations over Greece

  • S. Mystakidis
  • P. Zanis
  • C. Dogras
  • E. Katragkou
  • I. Pytharoulis
  • D. Melas
  • E. Anadranistakis
  • H. Feidas
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Atmospheric Sciences book series (SPRINGERATMO)

Abstract

A set of six yearly high resolution (10 × 10 km) regional climate simulations were carried out over Greece using RegCM3 in the framework of the project GEOCLIMA based on different setups for the convective scheme. Specifically, the simulations comprised two experiments using the Grell convective scheme with Fritsch-Chappell (FC) closure assumption and four experiments using the Emanuel convective scheme. The aim of the study is the optimization of the model for Greece by comparing simulated values of near surface temperature, precipitation and cloudiness with the respective observed values at 84 Greek stations. The model domain is nested to a coarser RegCM3 European domain (at a resolution of 25 × 25 km) driven by the ERA-40 reanalysis dataset. Simulations using the modified Emanuel convective scheme reduce mean bias (and RMSE) in temperature over 25% (20%), in cloudiness over 20% (10%) and in precipitation over 70% (40%). Results show that the model for the Greek area is more sensitive to changes in autoconversion threshold than changes in relaxation rate.

Keywords

Root Mean Square Error Regional Climate Model Mean Absolute Error Convective Scheme Total Cloud Cover 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Regional Development Fund) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program “Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship” of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) – Research Funding Program COOPERATION 2009 (no 09ΣYN-31-1094, Title “Development of a Geographic Climate Information System”). The later boundary conditions for our simulations were provided by Earth System Physics Section, ICTP, Trieste, Italy.

References

  1. Emanuel KA (1991) A scheme for representing cumulus convection in large-scale models. J Atmos Sci 48:2313–2335. doi:10.1175/1520-0469(1991) 048<2313:ASFRCC>2.0.CO;2CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Fritsch JM, Chappell CF (1980) Numerical prediction of convectively driven mesoscale pressure systems. Part I: convective parameterization. J Atmos Sci 37:1722–1733. doi:10.1175/1520-0469(1980)037<1722:NPOCDM>2.0.CO;2CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Giorgi F (1990) On the simulation of regional climate using a limited area model nested in a general circulation model. J Clim 3:941–963. doi:10.1175/1520-0442(1990) 003<0941: SORCUA>2.0.CO;2CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Grell GA (1993) Prognostic evaluation of assumptions used by cumulus parameterizations. Mon Weather Rev 121:764–787. doi:10.1175/1520-0493(1993) 121<0764:PEOAUB>2.0.CO;2CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Pal JS et al (2007) Regional climate modeling for the developing world: the ICTP RegCM3 and RegCNET. Bull Amer Met Soc 88:1395–1409. doi: 10.1177/BAMS-88-9-1395 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Segele TZ, Leslie LM, Lamb JP (2009) Evaluation and adaptation of a regional climate model for the Horn of Africa: rainfall climatology and interannual variability. Int J Climatol 29:47–65. doi: 10.1002/joc.1681 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Torma C, Coppola E, Giorgi F, Bartholy J, Pongrácz R (2011) Validation of a high-resolution version of the regional climate model RegCM3 over the Carpathian basin. J Hydrometeorol 12:84–100. doi: 10.1175/2010JHM1234.1 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Zanis P, Douvis C, Kapsomenakis I, Kioutsioukis I, Melas D (2009) A sensitivity study of the Regional Climate Model (RegCM3) to the convective scheme with emphasis in central eastern and southeastern Europe. Theor App Climatol 97:327–337. doi: 10.1007/s00704-008-0075-8 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Mystakidis
    • 1
  • P. Zanis
    • 1
  • C. Dogras
    • 1
  • E. Katragkou
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. Pytharoulis
    • 1
  • D. Melas
    • 2
  • E. Anadranistakis
    • 3
  • H. Feidas
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Meteorology and Climatology, School of GeologyAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  2. 2.Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Physics DepartmentAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  3. 3.Hellenic National Meteorological ServiceEllinikonGreece

Personalised recommendations