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An Objective Classification of Synoptic Types over Europe

  • C. Michailidou
  • P. Maheras
  • C. Anagnostopoulou
  • I. Tegoulias
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Atmospheric Sciences book series (SPRINGERATMO)

Abstract

A synoptic classification scheme is developed for Europe based on an automated two-step cluster analysis. It employs daily NCEP-NCAR reanalysis data over 62 years (1948–2009) in creating synoptic types from surface and upper air (1,000, 850, 700 and 500 hPa) temperature and humidity data as well as geopotential height and winds aloft. The synoptic types that have been created exhibit distinct seasonal preferences.

Keywords

Geopotential Height Circulation Type Synoptic Type Synoptic Classification Cyclonic Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Michailidou
    • 1
  • P. Maheras
    • 1
  • C. Anagnostopoulou
    • 1
  • I. Tegoulias
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Meteorology – Climatology, School of GeologyAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece

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