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Effects of Albedo on Solar Irradiance

  • A. Kreuter
  • M. Blumthaler
  • A. R. Webb
  • A. F. Bais
  • R. Kift
  • N. Kouremeti
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Atmospheric Sciences book series (SPRINGERATMO)

Abstract

The effects of ground albedo on solar radiation were investigated in a field campaign around Ny Alesund on Svalbard, Norway. In spring time this site exhibits high albedo gradients at the interface between sea water and snow covered land. Array spectroradiometers measuring global irradiance in the UV and visible wavelength range were installed at three field sites with increasing distance from the coastline towards the snow covered glaciers with a horizontal distance of about 20 km. For 3 weeks, quasi synchronous spectra were collected under clear sky and overcast sky conditions. At 320 nm, an enhancement of up to 15% of the global irradiance for clear sky was observed at the higher albedo site relative to the coastal site. Under overcast conditions this enhancement of irradiance was as high as 30%. The measurements agree well with a 1D radiative transfer model, considering an effective average albedo. Diurnal asymmetries of the irradiance have been observed and require a full 3D model treatment to account for the highly inhomogeneous albedo environment and the non-Lambertian reflectance of water (sun glint).

Keywords

Aerosol Optical Depth Spectral Ratio Solar Zenith Angle Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function High Albedo 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The campaign was funded by ARCFAC project ID32. We thank S. Wuttke and the AWI for supplying the AWI UV-Data. We also thank B. Mayer and R. Buras for valuable discussions of 3D effects and first MYSTIC calculations.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Kreuter
    • 1
  • M. Blumthaler
    • 1
  • A. R. Webb
    • 2
  • A. F. Bais
    • 3
  • R. Kift
    • 2
  • N. Kouremeti
    • 3
  1. 1.Division for Biomedical PhysicsInnsbruck Medical UniversityInnsbruckAustria
  2. 2.School of Earth Atmospheric and Environmental SciencesUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK
  3. 3.Laboratory of Atmospheric PhysicsAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece

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