Aerosol Size over the Broader Greek Area Based on Satellite and Ground Measurements

  • M. Koras-Carraca
  • A. Gkikas
  • C. D. Papadimas
  • N. Mihalopoulos
  • N. Hatzianastassiou
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Atmospheric Sciences book series (SPRINGERATMO)

Abstract

A first estimate of aerosol size over the broader Greek area (33.5°N-42.5°N and 18.5°E-29.5°E) is attempted by using satellite- and ground-based measurements for the 10-year period 2000–2010. A complete spatial coverage is ensured by daily gridded data derived from measurements taken from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard the NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites. More specifically, MODIS Collection 5.1 Ångström Exponent (α), Fine Fraction (FF) and aerosol Mean Effective Radius (reff) 1° × 1° latitude-longitude data are used, over both land and sea. The obtained results reveal a geographical variability of aerosol size over the Greek area. Values of FF and α, are greater over the northern than southern part of the region, exhibiting a north-to-south gradient, as well as over land than sea. The smallest FF and α values (≈0.1 and 0.5, respectively) appear over the southern Aegean and Ionian Sea, and south of Crete, indicating the influence of transported coarse dust particles from the Sahara desert. These patterns of aerosol size are also confirmed by the distribution of reff values (0.25–0.58 μm) over the region. The satellite-based results are evaluated against daily surface AERONET with the MODIS sea products providing a better agreement than the land ones.

Keywords

Biomass Burning Effective Radius Ground Measurement MODerate Resolution Image Spectroradiometer Aerosol Optical Property 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Koras-Carraca
    • 1
  • A. Gkikas
    • 1
  • C. D. Papadimas
    • 1
  • N. Mihalopoulos
    • 2
  • N. Hatzianastassiou
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Meteorology, Department of PhysicsUniversity of IoanninaIoanninaGreece
  2. 2.Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory, Department of ChemistryUniversity of CreteHeraklionGreece

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