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Catastrophic Deep-Seated Landslide at Xiaolin Village in Taiwan Induced by 2009.8.9 Typhoon Morakot

  • Su-Chin Chen
  • Ko-Fei Liu
  • Lien-Kuang Chen
  • Chun-Hung Wu
  • Fawu Wang
  • Shih-Chao Wei
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

Xiaolin village is located in Kaohsiung County, Taiwan. During typhoon Morakot, a deep-seated, dip-slope landslide with an area of 2.5 km2 and a volume of 2.7 × 107 m3 occurred and killed more than 400 people. It began at 6:17 a.m. on August 9, 2009 due to heavy rainfall. The mean depth of Xiaolin landslide was 44.6 m. The main sediment slid through an original valley, dammed the Chishan River, and buried a part of the Xiaolin village. Dam-breaking occurred shortly after and buried remaining part of the village. It was the most devastating disaster occurred since the typhoon warning system was established in Taiwan in 1992. This paper gives a detailed report on the event and analyzes the disaster through comparison of the geographical change. The detailed description in this paper can provide important criterion for predicting and emergency response to similar large scale landslide disaster in the future.

Keywords

Typhoon Morakot Deep-seated landslide Xiaolin landslide Dam break 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Professor C.T. Lee and Dr. W.N. Wang for providing us useful geologic information and constructive comments. Special thanks for National Science and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction, Taiwan for providing part of the data in this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Su-Chin Chen
    • 1
  • Ko-Fei Liu
    • 2
  • Lien-Kuang Chen
    • 3
  • Chun-Hung Wu
    • 1
  • Fawu Wang
    • 4
  • Shih-Chao Wei
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Soil and Water ConservationNational Chung Hsing UniversityTaichungTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Civil EngineeringNational Taiwan UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  3. 3.National Science and Technology Center for Disaster ReductionNew Taipei CityTaiwan
  4. 4.Department of GeoscienceShimane UniversityMatsueJapan

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