Religious and Cultural Influences on Water Management

  • Robert Maliva
  • Thomas Missimer
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

Keywords

Religious Teaching Wastewater Reuse True Believer Islamic Scholar Aesthetic Consideration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Maliva
    • 1
  • Thomas Missimer
    • 2
  1. 1.Schlumberger Water ServicesFort MyersUSA
  2. 2. Water Desalination and Reuse CenterKing Abdullah University of Science and TechnologyThuwalSaudi Arabia

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